Community Opinion

Upside Down Under

Where did the UFOs go?… There was a documentary on TV recently that described a direct correlation between the build-up of nuclear weapons and the number of UFO sightings.

By Marvin Baker

There were a number of interesting sidebars that came out of this two-hour documentary. First of all, when the nuclear arsenal was built in the United States, it included North Dakota, Montana and Wyoming. Both Air Force bases in North Dakota were armed with nukes, as was Malmstrom Air Force Base in Great Falls, Mont., and Warren Air Force Base, just outside of Cheyenne, Wyo.

It appears that Air Force personnel went to great lengths to keep the public from finding out most information about UFOs. Documents obtained by the producer of the documentary through Freedom of Information Act requests, indicated that missile crews from the Minot Air Force Base described strange goings on in the remote, rural areas of North Dakota. One of them included a crew that saw seven saucer-type objects over the top of a missile site. As the crew watched the UFOs, they hovered and shined intense and highly-focused beams at warehouses that either had weapons or weapon systems in them.

In another example, a former commander at Warren AFB said he watched a UFO on radar circle around the missile field in rural Wyoming, darting across the sky back and forth like a yo-yo; something that no aircraft on earth was capable of doing.

Where this really gets interesting is documents that were smuggled out of Russia after the fall of the Soviet Union, indicated the very same thing was happening in missile fields in Siberia. Time and time again since the proliferation of UFO sightings in 1947, people have blamed the Russians for having some sort of magic, if you will, to make us believe that we are being visited from outer space. It turns out, the Russians were under the same microscope as the United States during the height of the Cold War.

If you go back through the files all the way to the Roswell incident and track it forward, you will see a continued increase of UFO sightings up until about 1972 when they began to taper off rapidly. And since North Dakota had silos from Cavalier to the Montana line and south to Cooperstown and Killdeer, it’s no wonder so many people reported UFOs, especially during the 1960s. Three years ago a number of UFO sightings that had been classified were placed into the public domain.

Almost all of them were sightings that were directly related to an Air Force Base. The same is true with these more recent Freedom of Information Act requests.

All of the sightings that involved the Minot and Grand Forks Air Force Bases, had another interesting link. There was never any damage done; nobody was ever abducted. and nothing was ever removed or stolen. It led Air Force command to conclude that whoever was operating the objects, including a few that were spotted around nuclear power plants, were surveilling the United States and the Soviet Union to make sure nukes were never launched.

Perhaps the most bizarre report that came out of the FOIA requests was a situation at Warren AFB where the launch systems were activated for no apparent reason. For 7 minutes, Air Force officials scrambled to stop what would have been a launch on Russia. And just about the time they found the capacity to override the launch systems, everything stopped and went back to normal.

That same commander who watched the UFO on radar, in hindsight, said he firmly believed that whoever was in the UFOs, they were testing the United States to prove what would happen if a nuke actually got launched. At the time, he had no idea Russian facilities were being surveilled, but that very well could have been the answer.

The documentary was based on a book written by Robert Hastings titled “UFOs and Nukes, Extraordinary Encounters at Nuclear Weapons Sites.” Obviously a book can go into far greater detail than a movie and describes a lot of encounters with Project Blue Book that weren’t in the documentary. The book is available on Amazon for $34.95. Additionally, there are a number of news reports about this phenomenon following the release of the book in 2017.